Seth J Prins

is a social and psychiatric epidemiologist. His two programs of research concern the collateral consequences of mass incarceration for mental illness and substance use, and how the division and structure of labor influence mood disorders.

The Atlantic - The Secret Suffering of the Middle Manager

 Bourree Lam reports on our study of contradictory class locations:

When researchers try to determine the types of workers who are most prone to depression, the focus is usually on the misery of those at the bottom of a company’s hierarchy—the presumed stressors being the menial duties they’re tasked with and their lack of say in defining the scope of their jobs.

But it turns out that middle managers have it worse. In a new study from researchers at Columbia University, of nearly 22,000 full-time workers (from a dataset from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions), they saw that 18 percent of supervisors and managers reported symptoms of depression. For blue-collar workers, that figure was 12 percent, and for owners and executives, it was only 11 percent.