Seth J Prins

is a social and psychiatric epidemiologist. His two programs of research concern the collateral consequences of mass incarceration for mental illness and substance use, and how the division and structure of labor influence mood disorders.

Fox News - Wage gap may increase women's risk of depression, anxiety

The U.S. wage gap could be making women ill, says a new study showing women with lower incomes than their male counterparts are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety. The risk of women who make less money than men developing an anxiety disorder is more than four times higher, said the study by researchers at New York’s Columbia University who compared women and men with matching education and work experiences.

The Guardian - Depression and anxiety in women linked to male-female pay gap

The wage gap in the US could be making women ill, says a study showing women with lower incomes than their male counterparts are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety. Women who make less money than men were four times more likely to develop an anxiety disorder, , researchers at New York’s Columbia University found after comparing women and men with matching education and work experience.

Washington Post - The gender wage gap isn’t just unfair. It also ups the odds women get anxiety or depression.

Studies have long shown that women are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety than men. And attempts have long been made to explain it, citing everything from biological differences to the challenges women disproportionately face, such as balancing the additional child care and family responsibilities often expected of them with their own careers. But a new study by researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health points to another possible culprit: The gender wage gap, and the potential underlying discrimination and biases that may go with it.

New York Magazine - Middle Management: The Worst of Both Worlds

Melissa Dahl reports on our recent study of contradictory class locations:

In a paper published online last month in the journal Sociology of Health & Illness, they write that those in middle-management positions are more likely to suffer from depression than either their underlings or their superiors. The team, led by Columbia epidemiologist Seth J. Prins, used a pretty huge sample size for their research: more than 20,000 survey respondents gathered from full-time workers who took part in the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. From that, Prins and his co-authors were able to analyze the responses of owners and executives, managers and supervisors, and low-level worker bees on their experiences with depression.

Washington Post - The perilous plight of middle managers

Ariana Eunjung Cha reports on our recent study on contradictory class locations:

It’s no wonder why middle managers are so often the punchline of work-related jokes. Sandwiched between bosses who sometimes overlook them and junior staff who sometimes resent them, you could argue that they have the most stressful jobs in the modern world.

Now researchers have quantified just how much this work weighs on their mental health.

In a study published in the journal Sociology of Health & Illness on Tuesday, researchers found that these middle managers were significantly more likely to suffer symptoms of depression and anxiety than their counterparts at the top or bottom of the workplace hierarchy.

The Atlantic - The Secret Suffering of the Middle Manager

 Bourree Lam reports on our study of contradictory class locations:

When researchers try to determine the types of workers who are most prone to depression, the focus is usually on the misery of those at the bottom of a company’s hierarchy—the presumed stressors being the menial duties they’re tasked with and their lack of say in defining the scope of their jobs.

But it turns out that middle managers have it worse. In a new study from researchers at Columbia University, of nearly 22,000 full-time workers (from a dataset from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions), they saw that 18 percent of supervisors and managers reported symptoms of depression. For blue-collar workers, that figure was 12 percent, and for owners and executives, it was only 11 percent.